Twitter Search / NBCLatino: Current Situation: Migrants broke through this wooden fence to try and cross into the US via the train tracks and are now being pushed back by riot police – the border crossing remains closed and the migrants have nowhere to go but to turn around and go back #MigrantCaravanpic.twitter.com/nwBYQ2EhIV – At Garita Internacional San Ysidro

Current Situation: Migrants broke through this wooden fence to try and cross into the US via the train tracks and are now being pushed back by riot police – the border crossing remains closed and the migrants have nowhere to go but to turn around and go back – At Garita Internacional San Ysidro

Twitter Search / NBCLatino

Saved Stories – The Puerto Rico Times: Economic Opportunity for Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico was in a tough economic position before Hurricane Maria. Former Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla had declared the territory’s enormous debt “unpayable” — the result of decades of borrowing more than the Island could hope to pay back. Nearly half the residents of Puerto Rico lived in poverty and the population was both dwindling and aging as working people left Puerto Rico for the mainland.

The hurricane was economically devastating. More than 80% of the island’s crops were destroyed, some 8,000 small businesses closed permanently, and unreliable electricity and water interfered with economic recovery for nearly a year.

But Puerto Rico is recovering, and a number of industries show promise.

Tourism

Puerto Rico is a beautiful island, a tropical paradise, home of the only rainforest in the United States National Parks system, and well known for its music, food, arts, and friendly atmosphere.

Yet before the 2017 hurricane season Puerto Rico had just half the tourism income Hawaii has. Tourism fuels 25% of Hawaii’s economy but accounted for just 6% of Puerto Rico’s before the hurricane season. That is not only far less than Florida or Hawaii, but an extremely low number for the Caribbean, where tourism can often drive more than half of the total economy of some nations.

With the current focused efforts to encourage tourism on the Island, this industry could grow stronger than before.

Information technology

Puerto Rico has an educated, largely bilingual workforce. Remote hiring of U.S. citizens is easier for tech companies than relying on overseas workers. Information work is often outsourced by companies in many industries, and Puerto Rico lets employers avoid issues with currency and time zones.

All these factors make IT a promising field for Puerto Rico. Governor Rossello is actively courting IT companies.He sees Puerto Rico as a good place for a “human cloud,” which can work remotely for anyone in the world. At the same time, the Island is a good physical location for in-person collaboration among companies in the Americas.

The infrastructure is a key issue for IT. Unstable wi-fi and uncertain electricity would be serious obstacles to the governor’s plans. He wrote in a piece in Wired, “We’re giving businesses a chance to test new technologies on a once-unimaginable scale. The rebuilt energy and telecommunications system will be one of the most modern in the world.” If this happens, Puerto Rico could be in a perfect position to blossom into an IT hub.

Manufacturing

In the 20th century, Puerto Rico was positioned as the manufacturing hub of the Caribbean. Things weren’t really as good as they looked. In the early years, “manufacturing” referred primarily to poorly paid needlework done as piecework in homes. Later, special tax incentives allowed U.S. corporations to wash profits through Puerto Rico without providing many jobs or a significant boost to the economy.

Without the Section 936 deals, manufacturers will need a strong infrastructure and robust logistics to consider building factories inn Puerto Rico. However, companies which build facilities in Puerto Rico will benefit from the “Made in the USA” label and the shorter supply chain compared with Asian factories.

Local businesses can also move into manufacturing, benefiting from the educated workforce and the Opportunity Zone advantages.

Agriculture

Agriculture was beginning to show promise before the hurricanes struck, but the industry had become very weak before that brief renaissance The territory was importing 85% of its food. After Hurricane Maria, it was clear that Puerto Rico would be better off with more local food sources.

Puerto Rico could grow much more in food crops than it currently does. Local farms were increasingly being used in restaurants on the Island before the 2017 earthquake season interrupted the trend.

There may be many more opportunities, but these are some of the obvious good bets for Puerto Rico.

The post Economic Opportunity for Puerto Rico appeared first on Puerto Rico Report.

Saved Stories – The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times: puerto rico police – Google News: Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday – KWQC-TV6


KWQC-TV6

Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday
KWQC-TV6
Off Unknown CC. This video file cannot be played.(Error Code: 224003). Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday. Large police presence on 16th street in Moline on Saturday. KWQC’s Sarah Jones reported from the scene.

puerto rico police – Google News

The Puerto Rico Times

Puerto Rico Media – Opinions from Michael_Novakhov (7 sites): el nueva dia opinion – Google News: ¡Apasionada! Rashel Díaz de Un Nuevo Día bailando apretadito y en minishort por el mejor motivo – La Opinión (Comunicado de prensa)


La Opinión (Comunicado de prensa)

¡Apasionada! Rashel Díaz de Un Nuevo Día bailando apretadito y en minishort por el mejor motivo
La Opinión (Comunicado de prensa)
Estos días Rashel Díaz, conductora de Un Nuevo Día de Telemundo, ha lucido con un semblante muy particular, rozagante y feliz. El motivo no puede ser otro, el amor. La conductora cubana de 45 años celebró su aniversario junto a su pareja Carlos García.

el nueva dia opinion – Google News

Puerto Rico Media – Opinions from Michael_Novakhov (7 sites)

Puerto Rico Report: Economic Opportunity for Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico was in a tough economic position before Hurricane Maria. Former Governor Alejandro Garcia Padilla had declared the territory’s enormous debt “unpayable” — the result of decades of borrowing more than the Island could hope to pay back. Nearly half the residents of Puerto Rico lived in poverty and the population was both dwindling and aging as working people left Puerto Rico for the mainland.

The hurricane was economically devastating. More than 80% of the island’s crops were destroyed, some 8,000 small businesses closed permanently, and unreliable electricity and water interfered with economic recovery for nearly a year.

But Puerto Rico is recovering, and a number of industries show promise.

Tourism

Puerto Rico is a beautiful island, a tropical paradise, home of the only rainforest in the United States National Parks system, and well known for its music, food, arts, and friendly atmosphere.

Yet before the 2017 hurricane season Puerto Rico had just half the tourism income Hawaii has. Tourism fuels 25% of Hawaii’s economy but accounted for just 6% of Puerto Rico’s before the hurricane season. That is not only far less than Florida or Hawaii, but an extremely low number for the Caribbean, where tourism can often drive more than half of the total economy of some nations.

With the current focused efforts to encourage tourism on the Island, this industry could grow stronger than before.

Information technology

Puerto Rico has an educated, largely bilingual workforce. Remote hiring of U.S. citizens is easier for tech companies than relying on overseas workers. Information work is often outsourced by companies in many industries, and Puerto Rico lets employers avoid issues with currency and time zones.

All these factors make IT a promising field for Puerto Rico. Governor Rossello is actively courting IT companies.He sees Puerto Rico as a good place for a “human cloud,” which can work remotely for anyone in the world. At the same time, the Island is a good physical location for in-person collaboration among companies in the Americas.

The infrastructure is a key issue for IT. Unstable wi-fi and uncertain electricity would be serious obstacles to the governor’s plans. He wrote in a piece in Wired, “We’re giving businesses a chance to test new technologies on a once-unimaginable scale. The rebuilt energy and telecommunications system will be one of the most modern in the world.” If this happens, Puerto Rico could be in a perfect position to blossom into an IT hub.

Manufacturing

In the 20th century, Puerto Rico was positioned as the manufacturing hub of the Caribbean. Things weren’t really as good as they looked. In the early years, “manufacturing” referred primarily to poorly paid needlework done as piecework in homes. Later, special tax incentives allowed U.S. corporations to wash profits through Puerto Rico without providing many jobs or a significant boost to the economy.

Without the Section 936 deals, manufacturers will need a strong infrastructure and robust logistics to consider building factories inn Puerto Rico. However, companies which build facilities in Puerto Rico will benefit from the “Made in the USA” label and the shorter supply chain compared with Asian factories.

Local businesses can also move into manufacturing, benefiting from the educated workforce and the Opportunity Zone advantages.

Agriculture

Agriculture was beginning to show promise before the hurricanes struck, but the industry had become very weak before that brief renaissance The territory was importing 85% of its food. After Hurricane Maria, it was clear that Puerto Rico would be better off with more local food sources.

Puerto Rico could grow much more in food crops than it currently does. Local farms were increasingly being used in restaurants on the Island before the 2017 earthquake season interrupted the trend.

There may be many more opportunities, but these are some of the obvious good bets for Puerto Rico.

The post Economic Opportunity for Puerto Rico appeared first on Puerto Rico Report.

Puerto Rico Report

The Puerto Rico Times: The News and Times Review from Michael_Novakhov (14 sites): The Puerto Rico News & Journal from Michael_Novakhov (9 sites): Puerto Rico Main News from Michael_Novakhov (67 sites): Twitter Search / elnuevoherald: “La desesperación latinoamericana”. Una columna de #Opinión de @CarlosAMontaner https://hrld.us/2AnG82d pic.twitter.com/rKrvn9cnev

“La desesperación latinoamericana”. Una columna de de https://hrld.us/2AnG82d 

Twitter Search / elnuevoherald

Puerto Rico Main News from Michael_Novakhov (67 sites)

The Puerto Rico News & Journal from Michael_Novakhov (9 sites)

The News and Times Review from Michael_Novakhov (14 sites)

The Puerto Rico Times

The News and Times Review from Michael_Novakhov (14 sites): The Puerto Rico News & Journal from Michael_Novakhov (9 sites): Puerto Rico Main News from Michael_Novakhov (67 sites): Twitter Search / elnuevoherald: “La desesperación latinoamericana”. Una columna de #Opinión de @CarlosAMontaner https://hrld.us/2AnG82d pic.twitter.com/rKrvn9cnev

“La desesperación latinoamericana”. Una columna de de https://hrld.us/2AnG82d 

Twitter Search / elnuevoherald

Puerto Rico Main News from Michael_Novakhov (67 sites)

The Puerto Rico News & Journal from Michael_Novakhov (9 sites)

The News and Times Review from Michael_Novakhov (14 sites)

puerto rico police – Google News: Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday – KWQC-TV6


KWQC-TV6

Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday
KWQC-TV6
Off Unknown CC. This video file cannot be played.(Error Code: 224003). Breaking News: Large Police Presence on 16th Street in Moline on Saturday. Large police presence on 16th street in Moline on Saturday. KWQC’s Sarah Jones reported from the scene.

puerto rico police – Google News

The Puerto Rico Times: The Puerto Rico Times: puerto rico business – Google News: How Small Business Saturday Helps Local Communities Thrive – NY1


NY1

How Small Business Saturday Helps Local Communities Thrive
NY1
American Express launched the campaign 9 years ago and it has since expanded to include Puerto Rico. The goal is to help mom-and-pop shops that create jobs in the community, and to reap the benefits of the holiday shopping season. “Bigger stores …

puerto rico business – Google News

The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times: puerto rico business – Google News: How Small Business Saturday Helps Local Communities Thrive – NY1


NY1

How Small Business Saturday Helps Local Communities Thrive
NY1
American Express launched the campaign 9 years ago and it has since expanded to include Puerto Rico. The goal is to help mom-and-pop shops that create jobs in the community, and to reap the benefits of the holiday shopping season. “Bigger stores …

puerto rico business – Google News

The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times: The Puerto Rico Times: Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News: How Does a Territory Become a State?

Thirty-two U.S. territories have already become states. How did they do it? What is the process for a territory to become a state?

The U.S. Constitution has the simple answer:

New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.

The big part of this sentence is, “New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union.” In other words, Congress can make a new State at any time, without any other requirements.

Changing State Borders

The rest of the sentence explains that Congress can’t make a new State within a State without permission from the State or States in question. So Congress couldn’t make Northern Colorado into an independent State without permission from Colorado’s legislature.

If Congress wanted to make a new state of Jefferson out of Southern Oregon and Northern California, and both Oregon and California agreed, Congress could create that state. The residents of the new State wouldn’t have to agree, though historically votes are usually taken before anything like this takes place.

What about territories?

Congress can make a territory into a State at any time, without getting permission from anyone.

Congress usually waits for a territory to request statehood. Some territories have requested statehood many times without getting any response from Congress. Utah, for example, formally asked for statehood eight times over a period of 50 years before being admitted to the Union.

Typically, once Congress gets the request for statehood, they make some conditions for the new state.

Conditions

The Northwest Ordinances decided to make territories wait until they had 60,000 residents before making them states. There were exceptions. Arkansas, for example, was admitted with fewer people than the requirement, possibly because they lied about their population. Colorado took a census of their residents in high summer, when all the miners present brought their population up past 60,000… instead of the 28,000 year-round residents. Kansas reputedly invited people in from Missouri to vote in order to bolster their apparent numbers.

The Northwest Ordinances also set the pattern for state constitutions. Congress would give permission to a territory to draft a constitution. If the state constitution did not harmonize with the U.S. Constitution, the territory would be sent back to work on it some more before being admitted to statehood.

Congress sent states back to the drawing board for racial discrimination in laws, especially laws about voting, and for laws that would not protect federal lands. Polygamy was the biggest factor delaying Utah’s admission.

But the U.S. Constitution doesn’t prevent Congress from making conditions for individual territories that want to become states. The Northwest Ordinance, as one scholar put it, meant that “Congress has developed a general process for the admission of new states, albeit a process which is rarely followed precisely in individual cases.”

During and around the Civil War, Congress made conditions that were obviously strategic. The custom of admitting states in pairs — one slave state with one free state — became so entrenched that even today many people believe that states must be admitted in pairs.

Other conditions seem to revolve around loyalty and being American enough. Louisiana had to agree to use English in its courts. New Mexico had to teach English in its schools and guarantee religious freedom. Hawaii, admitted during the Cold War, had to promise to make its public servants take loyalty oaths.

Some territories were required to hold a plebiscite to make sure that residents wanted statehood.

None of these conditions are required by law. They are all up to the whim of the Congress.

Congress votes

Once the territory meets the requirements of Congress, Congress votes. A simple majority in the House and the Senate is all that is required to make a new state.

The President of the United States then signs the bill. Some presidents in the past have refused, including Andrew Johnson and Grover Cleveland. Sometimes they have signed the next time the bill reached their desk, and sometimes Congress has waited for a new president, who has signed the bill.

Once this takes place, the territory becomes a State, and has all the rights, responsibilities, and powers of a State.

Puerto Rico

The Puerto Rico Statehood Admissions Bill is in committee, which is to say that it is still waiting on the House Natural Resources Committee to make a recommendation to the House. This recommendation could include conditions for Puerto Rico. Congress as a whole could also set conditions when they take a vote on the bill.

Puerto Rico certainly has a large enough population, and Congress has already approved Puerto Rico’s constitution. If there are any other conditions, Puerto Rico would have to meet those requirements and then Congress would approve admission for Puerto Rico.

Some people believe that the other States must ratify Puerto Rico’s admission, or that there would have to be a two thirds majority in the vote in Congress. These misconceptions just show how long it has been since the U.S. last admitted a state. A simple majority is all that is required.

The post How Does a Territory Become a State? appeared first on Puerto Rico Report.

Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News

The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times

The Puerto Rico Times: Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News: How Does a Territory Become a State?

Thirty-two U.S. territories have already become states. How did they do it? What is the process for a territory to become a state?

The U.S. Constitution has the simple answer:

New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union; but no new States shall be formed or erected within the Jurisdiction of any other State; nor any State be formed by the Junction of two or more States, or parts of States, without the Consent of the Legislatures of the States concerned as well as of the Congress.

The big part of this sentence is, “New States may be admitted by the Congress into this Union.” In other words, Congress can make a new State at any time, without any other requirements.

Changing State Borders

The rest of the sentence explains that Congress can’t make a new State within a State without permission from the State or States in question. So Congress couldn’t make Northern Colorado into an independent State without permission from Colorado’s legislature.

If Congress wanted to make a new state of Jefferson out of Southern Oregon and Northern California, and both Oregon and California agreed, Congress could create that state. The residents of the new State wouldn’t have to agree, though historically votes are usually taken before anything like this takes place.

What about territories?

Congress can make a territory into a State at any time, without getting permission from anyone.

Congress usually waits for a territory to request statehood. Some territories have requested statehood many times without getting any response from Congress. Utah, for example, formally asked for statehood eight times over a period of 50 years before being admitted to the Union.

Typically, once Congress gets the request for statehood, they make some conditions for the new state.

Conditions

The Northwest Ordinances decided to make territories wait until they had 60,000 residents before making them states. There were exceptions. Arkansas, for example, was admitted with fewer people than the requirement, possibly because they lied about their population. Colorado took a census of their residents in high summer, when all the miners present brought their population up past 60,000… instead of the 28,000 year-round residents. Kansas reputedly invited people in from Missouri to vote in order to bolster their apparent numbers.

The Northwest Ordinances also set the pattern for state constitutions. Congress would give permission to a territory to draft a constitution. If the state constitution did not harmonize with the U.S. Constitution, the territory would be sent back to work on it some more before being admitted to statehood.

Congress sent states back to the drawing board for racial discrimination in laws, especially laws about voting, and for laws that would not protect federal lands. Polygamy was the biggest factor delaying Utah’s admission.

But the U.S. Constitution doesn’t prevent Congress from making conditions for individual territories that want to become states. The Northwest Ordinance, as one scholar put it, meant that “Congress has developed a general process for the admission of new states, albeit a process which is rarely followed precisely in individual cases.”

During and around the Civil War, Congress made conditions that were obviously strategic. The custom of admitting states in pairs — one slave state with one free state — became so entrenched that even today many people believe that states must be admitted in pairs.

Other conditions seem to revolve around loyalty and being American enough. Louisiana had to agree to use English in its courts. New Mexico had to teach English in its schools and guarantee religious freedom. Hawaii, admitted during the Cold War, had to promise to make its public servants take loyalty oaths.

Some territories were required to hold a plebiscite to make sure that residents wanted statehood.

None of these conditions are required by law. They are all up to the whim of the Congress.

Congress votes

Once the territory meets the requirements of Congress, Congress votes. A simple majority in the House and the Senate is all that is required to make a new state.

The President of the United States then signs the bill. Some presidents in the past have refused, including Andrew Johnson and Grover Cleveland. Sometimes they have signed the next time the bill reached their desk, and sometimes Congress has waited for a new president, who has signed the bill.

Once this takes place, the territory becomes a State, and has all the rights, responsibilities, and powers of a State.

Puerto Rico

The Puerto Rico Statehood Admissions Bill is in committee, which is to say that it is still waiting on the House Natural Resources Committee to make a recommendation to the House. This recommendation could include conditions for Puerto Rico. Congress as a whole could also set conditions when they take a vote on the bill.

Puerto Rico certainly has a large enough population, and Congress has already approved Puerto Rico’s constitution. If there are any other conditions, Puerto Rico would have to meet those requirements and then Congress would approve admission for Puerto Rico.

Some people believe that the other States must ratify Puerto Rico’s admission, or that there would have to be a two thirds majority in the vote in Congress. These misconceptions just show how long it has been since the U.S. last admitted a state. A simple majority is all that is required.

The post How Does a Territory Become a State? appeared first on Puerto Rico Report.

Saved Stories – Puerto Rico News

The Puerto Rico Times